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Our History | Commonwealth Games 2022

2 min

The Commonwealth Games bring nations together in a colourful celebration of sport and human performance. But the Games have evolved dramatically since its beginnings in 1930.

Held every four years, with a hiatus during World War II, the Games have grown from featuring 11 countries and 400 athletes, to a global spectacle of 4,600 sports men and women from across 72 nations and territories.

Underpinned by the core values of humanity, equality and destiny, the Games aim to unite the Commonwealth family through a glorious festival of sport. Often referred to as the ‘Friendly Games’, the event is renowned for inspiring athletes to compete in the spirit of friendship and fair play.

Some of the most memorable sporting moments in history took place at the Commonwealth Games:

At the 1954 Vancouver Games, Roger Bannister and John Landy became the first people to break the four-minute mile in a race that became known as the ‘Miracle Mile’.

Chantal Petitclerc became the first gold medal winner in a para-sport in 2002. An occasion that marked the first time an event for an athlete with a disability had been part of the official programme.

And women’s boxing became a mainstay of the Commonwealth Games in 2014 with Team England’s Nicola Adams taking the first gold medal in the flyweight division.

The encouraging ethos of the Games has stirred athletes to sprint faster, leap higher and push themselves to the very limits of what the human body is capable of.

The 2022 Games will be the first time West Midlands has played host to the event, following London 1934, and Manchester 2002. As preparations for the Birmingham 2022 Commonwealth Games take shape, the West Midlands become part of a lasting legacy. One that displays world-class teamwork, athleticism and friendship.

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