Fraser-Pryce reigns supreme in women's 100m at Jamaican Olympic trials

Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce of Jamaica competes in the Women's 100m at the Rio 2016 Olympic Games
Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce of Jamaica competes in the Women's 100m at the Rio 2016 Olympic Games

The world champion beat reigning Olympic champion Elaine Thompson-Herah in a star-studded final.

Jamaican sprinting superstar Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce sounded a warning to her competitors at the Olympic track and field athletics trials in Kingston, Jamaica, on Friday, sprinting to the national title in a time of 10.71 seconds.

Fraser-Pryce showed impressive top-end speed to win the race against a world-class field that including reigning Olympic champion Elaine Thompson-Herah, who had to settle for third place in 10.84.

One-lap sprint specialist Shericka Jackson was one of the surprise packages in the women’s 100m, finishing second behind Fraser-Pryce with a time of 10.82. The Olympic 400m bronze medallist was in spectacular form, slashing her personal best in both the heats and the semi-finals. She dipped below 11 seconds for the first time to clock the fastest time of the heats crossing the line in 10.91 seconds. The 26-year-old produced the goods again in the semi-finals, winning her race in an impressive 10.77. Her new personal best catapulted her into 13th place on the world all-time list.

Fraser-Pryce's victory cemented her place to Tokyo 2020, her fourth Games, where she will be looking to become the first woman to win three 100m gold medals at the global showpiece. She boasts the fastest time in the world this year, courtesy of the 10.63 seconds she ran at the same venue in early June. The time launched her into second place on the all-time list behind United States legend Florence Griffith-Joyner. Griffith-Joyner still has the three best times behind her name, including the world record of 10.49 from 1988.

“Honestly, Jamaican women’s sprinting is a light, I must give credit to all the ladies that showed up tonight because every time we have a national championship, you just have to be ready,” Fraser-Pryce said.

“It speaks volumes of the depth that we have and how mentally tough the ladies are, but I am extremely grateful to come here and put together a run.”

OSTRAVA, CZECH REPUBLIC - SEPTEMBER 08:  Tyquendo Tracey of Team Americas celebrates victory following the Mens 4x100 Metre Relay during day one of the IAAF Continental Cup at Mestsky Stadium on September 8, 2018 in Ostrava, Czech Republic.  (Photo by Stephen Pond/Getty Images for IAAF)
OSTRAVA, CZECH REPUBLIC - SEPTEMBER 08: Tyquendo Tracey of Team Americas celebrates victory following the Mens 4x100 Metre Relay during day one of the IAAF Continental Cup at Mestsky Stadium on September 8, 2018 in Ostrava, Czech Republic. (Photo by Stephen Pond/Getty Images for IAAF)
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Tracey gives Blake the Tyquendo treatment

In the men’s race, Tyquendo Tracey blasted out of the blocks to win the race in a time of 10.00, beating former world champion Yohan Blake to the line by 0.01s to claim the national title. Oblique Seville rounded off the podium in a time of 10.04 to reach the Olympic qualifying time by the skin of his teeth. Blake was the only man to run a sub-10 second time in the semi-finals with a season’s best time of 9.98.

Former world junior champion Jaheel Hyde was a dominant force in the men’s 400m hurdles, clocking a new personal best of 48.18 to punch his ticket for the Olympic Games. The 24-year-old chopped 0.34s to climb into fifth place in the world rankings this year.

In the women’s 400m hurdles, the first four women across the line met the Olympic qualifying time, with only the three podium finishers earning their qualifying spots.

Janieve Russell was unrivalled, winning the race in 54.07 with Ronda Whyte (54.94) and Leah Nugent (54.98), finishing second and third, respectively.