Pascal is the World Taekwondo Athletes’ Commission Co-Chair, and competed at Sydney 2000 and Athens 2004, winning bronze at both editions of the Games.

Representing World Taekwondo, Pascal joined athletes at Tokyo 2020, where he offered education on competition manipulation and the importance of integrity within sport.

It’s your responsibility to protect your sport and career, and Athlete365 has a number of resources to help you understand the dos and dont’s.

When you start sport at a young age, there may be times when you see something strange happen around you that makes you feel a little uneasy. As ambassadors, we’re here to help you understand what’s right and what’s wrong in sport when it comes to fixing, and to keep you from drifting to the dark side.

Meet the rest of our IOC ambassadors against competition manipulation.

Why education matters

I remember competing in qualification tournaments and being surprised by the behaviour of other athletes around me. At that time, I was shocked – even if it was a test event, I always wanted to win, to give my best, and to keep on fighting. That mentality is what I try to instil in others now, too.

Since those experiences, I have learned what competition manipulation is and possess a clear understanding of what’s acceptable and what isn’t in sport. It’s such experiences that make education so important – education will help you to quickly identify an issue and recognise your next steps in dealing with it.


We’re here to help you understand what’s right and what’s wrong in sport when it comes to fixing, and to keep you from drifting to the dark side.

Pascal Gentil


Sport has to reach a place where we can share our problems and immediately work on fixing them. Problems will always reach the surface eventually – by tackling them head on, we’re preventing them from blowing up

Pascal Gentil

Creating a pathway for the next generation

While the global pandemic has changed the way we can communicate, at Tokyo 2020 I had the privilege of speaking with some of you one-to-one to talk about the integrity of sport. I represented all the athletes from taekwondo and could really see the role young athletes could go on to have in protecting sport.

At the age of 36, I was still competing, and I remember looking around me and seeing such a mix of ages, with some competitors as young as 16. The recognition I received from my sporting career helped me to reach out to other athletes in my role as an ambassador; I hope to one day see the young athletes I came across towards the end of my career become part of the new generation of role models coming through.

Taking your problems seriously

As an IOC ambassador against competition manipulation and as Co-Chair of the World Taekwondo Athletes’ Commission, I’ve helped athletes to speak up on issues that we can no longer brush under the carpet. Collectively, sport has to reach a place where we can share our problems and immediately work on fixing them.

Problems will always reach the surface eventually – by tackling them head on, we’re preventing them from blowing up later. It’s about showing you that we’re taking what’s happening in your sport seriously. Not everything is beautiful in this world – but by facing it, we can work towards a better future.

As an athlete, you have a responsibility to protect your sport and your career. Learn about the IOC’s resources on the prevention of competition manipulation.