Canadian badminton player Michelle Li is an IOC ambassador against competition manipulation and reached the last 16 of the women’s singles at Tokyo 2020.

Michelle is also involved in the Badminton World Federation (BWF)’s “I am badminton”

Find out all you need to know about the dos and don’ts of sport via our dedicated page on the prevention of competition manipulation.

Sport provides so many valuable life lessons, and we all begin at the same starting line. We’re all working towards the same goals and trying to showcase the very best of our ability. Match-fixing, though, can change everything that we’ve been working so hard to achieve.

So when I was asked if I wanted to become an IOC ambassador against competition manipulation, I didn’t hesitate to get involved – I looked over the campaign and thought this is a cause that’s really important to me.

Meet our team of ambassadors against competition manipulation.

Embodying the campaign

Much of my role as an ambassador is about setting an example to existing athletes as well as the future generations of athletes. My role isn’t just about promoting the campaign, but embodying what it means to be a clean athlete. I’m helping to get the word out there on the dangers of competition manipulation and raising awareness around the subject.

At Tokyo 2020, I talked to other badminton players and people from Team Canada – they all know about the campaign, they see the posters, and they ask me about it. Hopefully I will be able to reach more and more people before Paris 2024.


My role isn’t just about promoting the campaign, but embodying what it means to be a clean athlete.

Michelle Li


You want to be able to represent your sport, your country, and yourself – so if you’re caught illegally manipulating the outcome of a match, the consequences for you could be huge.

Michelle Li

Using our voice

Awareness is growing now, with fewer athletes inclined to turn to match-fixing knowing the penalties you could face. Many of you also recognise that match-fixing is disrespectful, too. You want to be able to represent your sport, your country, and yourself – so if you’re caught illegally manipulating the outcome of a match, the consequences for you could be huge.

Education remains as important as ever. It’s crucial that there are people there to explain to you the dos and don’ts of sport. We are all working hard to fight and pursue our passions, and our performances as athletes should be a true representation of our ability. Match-fixing takes this authenticity away – that’s why, as ambassadors, we’re using our voices to help you avoid making any mistakes.

As an athlete, you have a responsibility to protect your sport and your career. Check out our resources on the prevention of competition manipulation.