The aim of Olympic Solidarity is to help NOCs support athletes, coaches and sports administrators to promote the Olympic values around the world, with a particular emphasis on those who are in greatest need of support.

The 2017-2020 report shows the impact Olympic Solidarity has had on athletes through various programmes, including scholarships to support athletes at the Games.

Programmes such as the NOC Athletes’ Commission (AC) Activity Grant award USD 10,000 to help encourage projects to empower athletes around the world.

What is Olympic Solidarity?

The first form of Olympic Solidarity began to take shape in 1960 as an assistance programme for countries, and particularly newly independent countries, to create and develop their own National Olympic Committees (NOCs), with the objective of developing sport and Olympic values globally.

Although it focuses primarily on athlete development, Olympic Solidarity also provides a number of programmes which support the training of coaches and sports administrators, thus allowing you and your fellow athletes to benefit from a well-prepared entourage that can offer you the skills you need to progress to a career after sport.

In the most recent four-year period (2017-2020), over 25,000 athletes benefited from Olympic Solidarity, through 2,700 scholarships and more than 13,500 NOC activities, including 64 forums, workshops and seminars.

Here are the ways in which Olympic Solidarity has supported athletes in recent years, as detailed in the 2017-2020 report.

Check out the report here.

 Getting athletes to the Games

Between 2017 and 2020, Olympic Solidarity scholarships were awarded to athletes competing at three editions of the Games: PyeongChang 2018, Tokyo 2020 and Beijing 2022. Across these three events, over 2,700 athletes have been supported on their journey, with the majority of Tokyo scholarships being extended for a year due to the impact of COVID-19.

Of those athletes, 827 qualified for Tokyo 2020, with 30 gold, 36 silver, 47 bronze medals and 185 diplomas won between the Olympic scholarship-supported competitors, including Doo Hoi Kem. At Tokyo 2020, Doo was part of the Hong Kong team who took Olympic bronze in the women’s team table tennis event.

“My ultimate goal is to win a medal at an Olympic Games for Hong Kong,” she said, prior to Tokyo 2020. “With the support of Olympic Solidarity, I can improve my performances by participating in more international competitions.”


With the support of Olympic Solidarity, I can improve my performances by participating in more international competitions.

 

Doo Hoi Kem


It’s been really useful for my training as a professional cyclist, and for helping me qualify for the Refugee Olympic Team.

Ahmad Badreddin Wais

Supporting refugee athletes

As part of supporting athletes on their journey to the Games, Olympic Solidarity has also been assisting NOCs of all countries that are hosting refugee athletes, with this programme benefiting refugee athletes across all five continents.

In total, 29 refugee scholarship holders from 13 countries of origin competed for the IOC Refugee Olympic Team Tokyo 2020 across 12 sports, including road cyclist Ahmad Badreddin Wais, who paid tribute to how the scholarship had helped his development.

“It’s been really useful for my training as a professional cyclist, and for helping me qualify for the Refugee Olympic Team,” he said. “Switzerland is an expensive country, so the scholarship allows me to focus full-time on training. Not only this, but it also teaches me how to interact with journalists and plan for competitions, which are important aspects of an athlete’s life.”

Giving athletes extra skills

Another focus of the last quadrennial was to equip NOCs with the tools they need to support you and your fellow athletes off the field of play. This is achieved through different programmes, such as the Athlete Career Transition (ACT) programme or NOC AC Activity Grants.

The ACT programme comes in two forms: individual grants to help you and other athletes complete education courses in a field of your own choice, and Athlete365 Career+ Power Up Outreach Workshops. More than 90 NOCs benefited from the ACT programme over the last Olympic cycle, with 46 individual education grants and 57 Career+ Outreach Workshops held in the same period.

No matter what stage you are at in your career, it’s important to think about what you want from the future. Find out more about the Career+ Power Up Workshops.

Meanwhile the NOC AC Activity Grants, which resulted from a recommendation from the 2019 International Athletes’ Forum, and was approved by the Olympic Solidarity Commission, have empowered athletes’ representatives across the globe by making USD 10,000 available each year per NOC AC. This grant can be used in a number of ways, such as establishing and developing ACs, holding educational seminars and forums, supporting national athlete career transition programmes, or creating stronger athlete networks within NOCs. The Guatemalan and Sierra Leonean NOCs are just two examples of those which have benefited from the USD 10,000 grant.

The Tajikistan NOC AC used the grant to conduct expert-led training seminars on topics such as safeguarding, anti-doping, sports psychology and more. Mavzuna Chorieva, Chair of the Tajikistan NOC AC, said: “Many [athletes] declared that the programme was filled with hugely necessary information in supporting their careers. The knowledge they’ve obtained will be incorporated into their daily practice and future work.”


Many [athletes] declared that the programme was filled with hugely necessary information in supporting their careers. The knowledge they’ve obtained will be incorporated into their daily practice and future work

 

Mavzuna Chorieva, Chair of the Tajikistan NOC AC

The Olympic Solidarity-funded NOC AC Activity Grants are an unmissable opportunity for your commission to strengthen its activities.